Tuesday, April 13, 2010

The lie that got asylum

The lie that got asylum

Brazilian homosexual is granted asylum in the US by putting Brazil in the stranger category of one of the world champions in violence and murders against homosexuals

By Julio Severo
Since 2003, the Lula administration has been promoting and imposing the gay agenda, not only in Brazil, but also in the world. Under Lula, Brazil was the first country to introduce, in 2003, a resolution in the UN classifying homosexuality as an inalienable human right. The same kind of resolution was introduced by the Brazilian government in the Organization of the American States.
Under the Lula administration, there is an increasing political and legal apparatus to scare and gag Brazilian citizens that disagree with the homosexual behavior. Federal campaign “Brazil without Homophobia” requires the government’s pro-homosexuality interference in every sphere of the Brazilian society.
Even so, Brazilian homosexual Augusto Pereira de Souza, 27, was granted asylum by the Barack Obama administration. His allegation? Persecution. He alleged that he cannot return to Brazil because Brazil is one of the most violent countries against homosexuals. In fact, the argument for his asylum request, as “Queerty” blog says, puts Brazil as one of the biggest murderers of homosexuals in the world, “with 180 reported LGBT murders in 2008 alone.”
The biggest propagandist of the numbers of homosexuals murdered in Brazil is Gay Group of Bahia (GGB), whose founder is Luiz Mott, who has been accused of advocating pedophilia. GGB, which was the first major militantly homosexual organization in Brazil, says that between 1980 and 2005 2,511 homosexuals were murdered throughout Brazil. GGB has no doubt: Brazil is the most homophobic nation in the world.
Souza’s defense was made by Suzanne Goldberg, professor at Columbia Law School’s Sexuality and Gender Law Clinic, together with their students. Goldberg used data from GGB to defend asylum for Souza.
According to the Columbia University website, “The grant, issued by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, comes at a time when conditions for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) individuals in Brazil are becoming more dangerous”. Yes, you have read it correctly: Columbia University is saying indeed that under the Lula administration’s strong pro-homosexuality policies, conditions for homosexuals in Brazil are becoming “more dangerous“. With that paranoia coming directly from the Columbia University, we wonder if conditions for homosexuals are becoming “safer” in Iran and Saudi Arabia.
If Brazil became “more dangerous”, so why did not Souza request asylum in Iran or Saudi Arabia?
Between 1980 and 2005, were only homosexuals murdered in Brazil? Official data shows that in that exact period of time over 800,000 men, women and children were murdered in Brazil. Today over 50,000 men, women and children are murdered in Brazil each year.
“Wait one minute”, a homosexual activist could say. “The government says that we are more than 10% of the population. Therefore, the number of murdered homosexuals should be 80,000!”
If the Gay Group of Bahia were the Hetero Group of Bahia, then the reaction would be totally different, “2,511 is a totally homophobic, prejudiced and discriminatory number, because it doesn’t achieve even 1% from 800,000. We demand at least 10% of the share of that high number. We want equality! If the Brazilian population is suffering a high rate of murders, we demand the same right!”
What about the 50,000 Brazilians murdered each year?
“We want 10% of this too. It is our right! We do not accept this homophobic, insignificant and mediocre number of just 180 homosexuals murdered each year!”
I don’t also understand why the number of murdered homosexuals is not larger, because of the dangers they choose to be exposed to. Oswaldo Braga, president of the Gay Movement of Minas, declared that transvestites are most of the murdered homosexuals in Brazil. He said, “They are homosexuals that are more involved in criminality, as prostitution and drug trafficking, being more exposed to violence”. (Tribuna de Minas, 09/03/2007, page 3.)
The number of 800,000 murdered Brazilians shows that Brazil lacks security. And there is a huge need of police patrols. Because of the government favoritism toward the homosexual agenda, will the few patrols available for the population have to be transferred to protect prostitution and drug trafficking zones frequented by homosexuals?
I was born in São Paulo, the same city Souza says that he suffered “persecution”. I remember that 25 years ago a friend and I, who we were very young, were going to the church service. We passed close to the Republic Square — an old homosexual point right in the downtown São Paulo —, and a group of about 6 homosexuals ran after us shouting lascivious words. It was a scary experience for two young men. This kind of bizarre homosexual behavior was common in the Republic Square and, of course, had the potential of attracting violent reactions from those that were not willing to run.
I should fear more than Souza does. Increasingly, shopping centers and other places in Brazil are being shamelessly used as prostitution points — right in the men’s bathrooms. And, maybe for fear, men look and ignore. I have already witnessed homosexuals that, inside of the shopping center bathroom, remain stationed as anal-sex cannibals, looking at each man entering, waiting an attack opportunity. What would happen if I were recognized as Julio Severo in a shopping center bathroom?
Based on data from the Gay Group of Bahia, Columbia University says, “In Brazil, police routinely fail to investigate violence committed against GLBT individuals.”
The Brazilian police have immense difficulty of investigating all the 50,000 murders a year, where heteros are victims. If the US wants to grant asylum to all of the victims of violent crimes in Brazil, the asylum requests will increase by at least 500,000 a year. Why to think that only Brazilian homosexuals are victims of violence and murders in a socialist system where strongly armed criminals are free to attack strongly unarmed victims? The whole Brazilian population is a victim of this cruel system.
While I am writing this article, Brazil has been shaken by the disappearance and murders of six teenagers (Diego, 13; Paulo Victor, 16; George, 17; Divino, 16; Flávio, 14; and Márcio Luiz, 19). The case received national repercussion this week with the arrest of the murderer, Admar de Jesus, a homosexual. He had served a four-year prison sentence for pedophilia in Brasília, but as soon as he was freed, he began to rape and murder boys. There are thousands of Brazilian boys victims of homosexual rapists each year. Will Columbia University fight for them to be granted asylum in the US too?
However, the grant of asylum to Souza may be part of a major political scheme between Brazilian gay activists and their American counterparts — and the presence of the Gay Group of Bahia is evidence of the involved activism. A strong anti-homophobia law has already been passed in the US and Souza’s asylum may give the Obama administration the perfect excuse to press Brazil to approve a law to “protect” homosexuals that up to now Lula and his administration were not able to pass, because of the Christian resistance.
That “protection” will, of course, protect, promote and impose even more the gay agenda in Brazil.
Most of the 800,000 murdered Brazilians were not in prostitution and drug trafficking zones. They also were not entitled to asylum in the US.
But many Brazilian homosexuals prefer to die than leaving their Republic Squares. With the asylum route opened by Souza, they may now have a second option: the “safe” prostitution and drug trafficking zones in the US.
So in a sense Brazil should be very grateful to Columbia University: If all Brazilian homosexuals follow the Souza route, Brazilian boys will nevermore suffer disappearances, rapes and murders by gay rapists, and Brazil will be free from gay activists, their lies and tyranny.
Portuguese version of this article: A mentira que ganhou asilo

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