Saturday, March 21, 2015

Highlights in the Brazilian week, March 15-20


Highlights in the Brazilian week, March 15-20

Sunday (15), Brazilian society was marked by protests against Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff. Massive demonstrations protested against corruption and called for her impeachment.
Even though the Rousseff administration has a prominent Socialist history of pro-abortion and pro-sodomy activism since 2011, the protests focused, according to Reuters, on “a sluggish economy, rising prices and corruption.”
The massive demonstrations included no protests against abortion and the homosexual agenda. Pro-abortion and pro-sodomy socialists also protested against Rousseff.
Monday (16), the Brazilian media run headlines about former Brazilian presidential candidate Levy Fidelix, condemned to pay a fine of R$ 1 million (over US$300,000) in a public civil action filed by the LGBT movement, because he had made statements in defense of family and children against the homosexual agenda. There was no massive or even small demonstration in his support. Representative Marco Feliciano, an evangelical minister, was the only prominent Brazilian figure to support Fidelix, a Catholic.
Thursday (19), Brazilian Supreme Court Justice Cármen Lúcia rejected an appeal from prosecutors who wanted to protect children from adoption by homosexual couples in the state of Paraná.
In her ruling, Justice Lúcia argued that the concept of Family cannot be restricted because of homoerotic couples, according to Exame magazine.
In her view, the concept of Family, with norms of visibility, continuity and stability, can also be applied to same-sex individuals.
Because this is a ruling coming from the highest Brazilian court, it is a major defeat for efforts to protect children from ideological, moral, spiritual and even physical abuse.
Friday (20), Rep. Marco Feliciano decried a decision by Prosecutor Promotor Thiago, who wants shopping malls bathrooms in the Federal District, where Brasilia is located, to be available to people not according to their biological sex, but according to their “gender identity.” His decision follows a new resolution from the Human Rights National Council of the Rousseff administration.
Feliciano asked, “What will people, who use bathrooms and dressing-rooms, feel when they see there an individual from the opposite sex? Are not they going to be embarrassed? What about the risk of molestation?”
He also asked, “Where are feminists? This resolution exposes women to embarrassment and dangers. What about malicious men and boys choosing to frequent ladies’ rooms?”
Last week, Feliciano introduced two bills addressing these issues. If passed, they will suspend the federal resolution.
Source: Katehon

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