Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Nazism: Nationalism and Socialism at the Service of Occultism


Nazism: Nationalism and Socialism at the Service of Occultism

By Julio Severo
The Brazilian Foreign Minister provoked a national controversy when he defined Nazism as a left-wing movement. The controversy got international headlines, especially in Israel, when Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, after visiting the Holocaust Museum in Jerusalem, agreed with his minister, even though the Jewish museum, a memorial to the 6 million Jews murdered by Nazi Germany during World War Two, clearly says that Nazism was a right-wing movement.
By making Nazism and socialism equal, Brazilian Foreign Minister Ernesto Araújo dismissed right-wing elements in Nazism. He ignored that the Jews, who were the main victims of Hitler, see Nazism as right-wing. And especially he dismissed the main influences on his own “conservatism” — which he calls traditionalism. You can read more here: Brazilian Foreign Policy: From Marxism to Occultism.
Araújo is not ashamed to admit that the main source of his traditionalism is the Islamic occultist René Guénon and his most prominent disciple, Julius Evola, a famous Italian philosopher. He was influenced by these two esotericists through Olavo de Carvalho, who for decades has been promoting Guénon in Brazil. Araújo is an adherent of Carvalho, Guénon and Evola.
Yet, when Araújo says that Nazism was a left-wing movement but he uses Evola as his “conservative” reference, he wages a war against common sense and embraces contradiction, because Evola praised and advised Nazis. Besides, Carvalho himself, who is treated as a master by Araújo, has recognized, “Nazism has left-wing and right-wing ideological elements.”
Guénon was anti-Marxist, and so was his disciple Evola. So how to define Nazism socialist if its name has “National” and it was advised by anti-Marxist Evola? Nazism persecuted the famous the Frankfurt School, which formed the current left-wing mindset in most Western universities. But the question that Araújo and others ask is: How not to define Nazism as a left-wing movement if its name has “Socialism”? This is a contradiction. But is not occultism rife with contradictions, confusion and chaos?
When you see the word nationalism, you imagine Trump’s slogan “Make America Great Again.” In contrast, when you see the word socialism, you just imagine socialism.
How to make sense from the apparent contradiction in “National Socialism,” the main Nazi slogan?
The reason is that Nazism was the most successful example of occultists using right-wing and left-wing imageries and elements to promote an occultist revolution.
So if you believe that Nazism was left-wing, you are right. And if you say that Nazism was right-wing, you are also right. But you would lose the point if you tried to define Nazism as exclusively left-wing or right-wing, because these ideological labels were only tools in the hands of occultists.
In his book “Hitler’s Cross: How the Cross of Christ was used to promote the Nazi agenda” (Moody Publishers, 1995), Rev. Erwin W. Lutzer, said that Nazism was an occult movement that used anti-Marxist propaganda.
Adolf Hitler was an occultist. So it is no wonder that he had Evola’s ideas and other occultists in his government. But how cannot you see that if Evola’s ideas is guiding the current Brazilian foreign policy, conservatism is, again, being used to exploit conservatives?
Connect the dots and you will see occultism again using ideological labels to promote itself. In a conference at the Vatican in 2014, Steve Bannon, who was expelled by Trump from the White House for opportunism, praised Guénon and Evola. Bannon is leading a nationalist and traditionalist movement. Read my article: Steve Bannon’s Occult Movement, Brazil and Conservative Evangelicals.
Bannon is also connected to Carvalho (read my article: Steve Bannon and Olavo de Carvalho Together: Two Occultists Promoting an Occult “Conservatism”), who is connected to Araújo.
Connect the dots and you will see occultists again seeking the control of conservative movements and governments.
In his remark about Nazism and socialism, Araújo said,
“It’s a subject I say a lot and it’s a trend especially from the left. It takes a good thing, hijacks it and perverts it, turning it into a bad thing. I think that’s more or less what always happens to these totalitarian regimes. That is why I also say that… fascism and Nazism are a left-wing phenomenon.”
But in Nazism, ideological labels are surpassed by occult interests. It would have been more helpful if Araújo had confessed,
“It’s a subject I say a lot (when I mention Guénon and Evola) and it’s a trend especially from occultism. It takes a good thing, hijacks it and perverts it, turning it into a bad thing. I think that’s more or less what always happens to these totalitarian regimes. That is why I also say that… fascism and Nazism are an occult phenomenon.”
If he had made such remark, he would have got right. Evola was the author of right-wing handbooks, including “A Handbook for Right-Wing Youth.” He was also the author of several occult books, including “Introduction to Magic: Rituals and Practical Techniques for the Magus.”
How can Bannon and Araújo conciliate their nationalism or conservatism with a sorcerer? In the same way that Evola conciliated right-wing rhetoric with witchcraft.
If right-wingers thought that only left-wingers could be fooled by occultists, the bad news is that they have been fooled too. And this is not the first time.
Occultists, including Evola, helped to develop Nazism by using nationalist and socialist labels to fool conservatives and socialists. After their scheme resulted in destruction, the public, without understanding the occult nature of Nazism, was left to fight over right-wing and left-wing labels.
In the discussion on Nazism, the public is incited to address only right-wing and left-wing labels and avoid the occult element behind the scenes. But it is exactly the occult nature that makes sense in everything about Nazism.
The absence of Jesus Christ in his life led Araújo to be drawn to Guénon’s and Evola’s traditionalism, through Carvalho. The same attraction happened in Carvalho and Bannon: Both were drawn to traditionalism through Guénon and Evola.
Nazism was occultism and Guenonian Evola was a part of it, just as Evola and Guenon are a part of Araújo’s traditionalism.
It is very tragic how prone Catholics are to occultism in its several forms and disguises. Guénon, Evola, Bannon, Carvalho and Araújo all have in common a connection to a nominal and powerless Catholicism. In fact, even Hitler was a nominal Catholic.
Trump identified Bannon as an opportunist, because he bragged that he, not conservative evangelicals, put Trump in the White House. In the same way, Brazilian Guenonians, especially Carvalho, think that they, not conservative evangelicals, put Jair Bolsonaro in the Brazilian presidency. Guenonians are by their own spiritual nature opportunists.
If Trump had not expelled Bannon, his occult revolution (a fake conservative revolution) would have advanced at the expense of Trump’s conservative evangelical base. Because Carvalho and his influence have not been expelled from the Bolsonaro administration, his revolution is advancing, at the expense of Bolsonaro’s conservative evangelical base.
I was firstly drawn to conservatism in the late 1970s and 1980s through Pat Robertson, Rex Humbard and their TV shows in Brazil. This conservatism has nothing to do with occultism and it has everything to do with the Bible. In fact, this evangelical conservatism empowers you, through the name of Jesus, to expel demons — and Guénon’s and Evola’s traditionalism is filled with demons.
The conservatism of Pat Robertson, Rex Humbard and other U.S. televangelists led me to the Bible. Guénon’s and Evola’s traditionalism leads victims to Satan and his deceptive propaganda.
May God deliver Araújo and Brazil from this dangerous propaganda.
Recommended Reading:

No comments :